Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine.
Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

2012 Medical Robotics

New Innovations in Medical Robotics

June 13, 2012

Guest from all over Houston gathered at Houston Methodist Research Institute on June 13th to explore innovations from the MITIE surgical robotics training facility,  the University of Houston and Rex Bionics, and the NASA Johnson Space Center’s Robonaut Project. 

New innovations in robotic technologies are making it possible for surgical procedures and medical treatments to be less invasive and more precise. Features like remote control allow operators to execute procedures on patients in extreme environments. Robotics are now routinely used for surgical procedures, and research is improving cardiovascular operations and making it possible for paralyzed patients to walk.  


News & Film

 

06/27/12
TV News clip: Researchers Working to Improve Robotic Legs
ABC13 Houston News, KTRK-TV

06/14/2012
Houston Innovators Help Medical Robots Step Into the Future
The Houston Business Journal 

06/14/2012
Research Offers the Promise of More Independence, Along With the Wow Factor
The Houston Chronicle

06/11/2012
At Houston Methodist, a Glimpse of Medical Robotics' Future


Agenda

Introduction:

David Hansen, Ph.D.
Chairman, MIT Enterprise Forum of Texas
President, SBC Polymers Consulting

Mauro Ferrari, Ph.D.
President & CEO
Houston Methodist Research Institute

Panelists:

Da Vinci Surgical Robotics
Brian J. Dunkin, M.D., FACS
Head, Section of Endoscopic Surgery
Medical Director, Methodist Institute for Technology, Innovation and Education

Robotic Surgery: A Revolution in Urology
Tim Boone, M.D., Ph.D.
Chairman, Department of Urology
Houston Methodist Hospital

Interventional Cardiology
Miguel Valderrabano, M.D.
Chief, Division of Cardiac Electrophysiology 
Houston Methodist Hospital

NeuroRex Lower-Limb Smart Exoskeleton
Jose L. (Pepe) Contreras-Vidal,  Ph.D.
Electrical and Computer Engineering Department
University of Houston

The NASA/GM Robonaut 2: A Dexterous Humanoid Robot for Space and Terrestrial Applications
Myron Diftler, Ph.D.
Robonaut Project Manager
NASA Johnson Space Center