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Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013

CLINICAL Notes Jason Sakamoto, Ph.D., interim co-chair of the Department of Nanomedicine; Michael Thrall, M.D., medical director of digital pathology and assistant professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College; Shanda Blackmon, M.D., M.P.H., thoracic surgeon in the Department of Surgery and assistant professor of surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College; Mauro Ferrari, Ph.D., president and CEO of The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Ernest Cockrell Jr., Distinguished Endowed Chair, and professor of biomedical engineering in medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College; and Min P. Kim, M.D., thoracic surgeon in the Department of Surgery, and assistant professor at Weill Cornell Medical College. Researchers at The Methodist Hospital and the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center have announced the development of a new technique that allows scientists to grow lung cancer cells in three dimensions. The process uses biological matter to form miniature lungs that mimic the structure and function of real lung cancer, after which researchers add human lung cancer cells. This technique could accelerate discoveries for a cancer that has benefited little from scientific research over the last several decades. Principal investigator Dr. Min Kim says new models for lung cancer research are crucial since current models cannot accurately predict what will happen in patients with lung cancer. Christie Ballantyne, M.D., director of the Center for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention at The Methodist Hospital. Researchers with The Methodist Hospital and eight other institutions say with a little exercise and dieting, overweight people with type 2 diabetes can still train their fat cells to produce a hormone believed to spur HDL cholesterol production. Ballantyne says of the findings published in the Journal of Lipid Research, that “even overweight people who are physically active and eating a healthy diet are getting benefits from the lifestyle change.” Ballantyne was principal investigator for the study. Youli Zu, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Cancer Pathology Laboratory at The Methodist Hospital Research Institute; co-director, hematopathology in the Department of Pathology and Genomic Medicine, The Methodist Hospital; associate professor of pathology and laboratory medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College. Zu has received a $1 million R33 grant from the National Cancer Institute to develop and validate an assay for the detection of circulating tumor cells. According to Zu, this test will be a great advance over the existing test, and will allow for earlier detection and more accurate results. The proposed assay will allow physicians to detect circulating tumor cells in one drop of patient blood and provide results in seconds. 64 methodisthealth.com/leadingmedicine


Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013
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