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Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013

THE METHODIST INSTITUTE FOR Reconstructive Surgery With state-of-the-art equipment and innovative surgical techniques, our dedicated team is committed to restoring lost form and function. WITH CENTERS FOR: • Reconstructive Microsurgery • Facial Paralysis Surgery and Functional Restoration • Breast Restoration • Lower Extremity Restoration (limb center) • Genito-Urinary and Pelvic Reconstruction • Body Contour Restoration Dr. Pierre M. Chevray Dr. Tue A. Dinh Dr. Warren A. Ellsworth, IV Dr. Jeffrey D. Friedman Dr. Michael J. Klebuc Dr. Michael A. Lypka Dr. Aldona J. Spiegel For more information about the Methodist Institute for Reconstructive Surgery please call 713-441-6100. 6560 Fannin Street Houston, Texas 77030 “If you use those grafts alone, the motion is always weaker than the normal side. But if you combine the masseter transfer and the cross-face nerve grafts, then there is a marriage of power and spontaneity that can produce a very natural-appearing smile.” Klebuc also implanted a weight in her upper eyelid to help the eye close. According to Espitia, the This operative diagram illustrates the masseter-to-facial nerve transfer with combined cross-face nerve grafts that Dr. Michael Klebuc performed on Karen Espitia. weight was removed after one year as the nerve grafts eventually allowed the eye to close in its own. “It wasn’t a surgery I had to have,” the teacher asserts. “The surgery was lengthy and complex, but I tell everyone I would have that surgery again in a heartbeat.” Klebuc contends that this surgical technique, while state-of-the-art, is not for everyone. But he notes there is a treatment available to almost everyone who suffers with some type of facial paralysis. “In long-standing cases of facial paralysis, we often transfer local muscles to restore an active smile or will transplant a segment of inner thigh muscle using microsurgical techniques,” Klebuc says. “If someone is very elderly, and they would not have physical stamina to go through a lengthy surgery, there are still other treatment options. “So even simple procedures have the potential to take somebody who is very self-conscious and reclusive and give them the confi dence to get back out into the community, doing grocery shopping, meeting with their friends and having a good quality of life. For many patients with facial paralysis, surgical treatment can be a real life-changer,” Klebuc says. n For more information about facial paralysis restoration procedures, visit Methodist Center for Facial Paralysis Surgery and Functional Restoration at methodisthealth.com/facialparalysis-smilerestoration. Leading Medicine • Volume 7, Number 1 5 9 59 Dr. Michael Klebuc


Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013
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