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Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013

CONQUERING the PAIN DEVICE PROVIDES RELIEF for CHRONIC PAIN SUFFERS By Linda Gilchriest Yvonne Redman discusses her treatment options with Dr. Richard Simpson. vonne Redman describes herself as a “tough cookie.” No challenge or pain ever got in her way — until a 2009 accident caused such severe back pain that even standing was too much for her. “It was excruciating pain,” Redman says. “I went into physical therapy, but that didn’t help.” Redman, 63, had surgery to remove damaged disks and months of therapy after that, but there was no relief. Redman says she was diagnosed with lower failed back syndrome: chronic back and leg pain that occurs after back surgery. But Redman, being a tough cookie, was not going to suffer without putting up a good fi ght. In June 2012, she saw Methodist’s Leading Medicine TV special, “Stop Living in Pain,” about chronic back and joint pain and began researching one of the procedures discussed — spinal cord stimulation. This led her to Dr. Pankaj Satija, director of the Pain Management Center at the Methodist Neurological Institute. To Redman’s relief, she turned out to be a good candidate for a spinal cord stimulator. “A spinal cord stimulator is a device to relieve pain,” Satija explains. “How it works is not completely illuminated yet.” He says the theory behind the device is that pain travels from the body to the brain through a sort of portal, or gate, in the spinal cord. With the stimulator, the sensation of pain Y 46 methodisthealth.com/leadingmedicine


Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013
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