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Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013

thletes are just like the rest of us; when they get sick, they need a family doctor. They need physical exams, fl u shots and treatments for A conditions like asthma, diabetes or a heart murmur. But active individuals — from pro athletes to weekend warriors — also require care to treat the aches, pains and injuries associated with sport and robust activity. In the past, caring for an active body usually meant having a primary care doctor and an orthopedist, but primary care sports medicine offers both types of care in a single physician. Primary care sports medicine has been an established practice for more than two decades, focused on giving holistic care to active individuals. From physicals and checkups to sinus infections and musculoskeletal injuries, these specialists provide the complete care of family medicine with a focus in sports medicine. Methodist offers a unique fellowship program for physicians seeking this specialization after completing a residency in family medicine, internal medicine, emergency medicine or pediatrics. “Active people need someone to keep them healthy and to fi x them up when they injure themselves,” says Dr. Scott Rand, a primary care sports medicine physician at Methodist Willowbrook Hospital and director of the sports medicine fellowship at Methodist. While musculoskeletal medicine is not always emphasized in family practice, “We are not limited by shoulders, knees or spines,” contends Rand, a team physician for Rodeo Houston. The one-year fellowship focuses on learning to manage musculoskeletal overuse or trauma, and physicians spend 36 weeks with orthopedic surgeons to better understand surgical and nonsurgical treatments and procedures for orthopedic injury. The remaining fellowship rotations are spent working with radiology and imaging specialists, physical therapists and rehabilitation medicine, concussion management, and specialized electives on areas such as Dr. David Braunreiter hand, foot, neurology, spine and other focused treatment areas. Every week also has specifi c times dedicated to practicing clinical skills in the Denver Harbor clinic and performing research that fellows will present at the annual American Medical Society for Sports Medicine conference. “Active individuals don’t like to seek care just anywhere; primary care sports medicine physicians care for the whole person actively,” says Dr. David Braunreiter, a sports medicine specialist with the Methodist Center for Sports Medicine in Sugar Land. Knowing the ins and outs of fractures, sprains, strains and stress injuries equips these doctors to treat active people and athletes in the offi ce or on the sidelines — for everything from managing asthma to coping with emotional stress. “It’s like getting the whole picture in a single physician,” says Braunreiter. The Methodist fellowship in primary care sports medicine has been established at Methodist Willowbrook Hospital and Methodist Sugar Land Hospital, which work collaboratively to promote total care for active people in Houston and the surrounding communities. There’s a powerful new team in town — you and your doctor. Whether you train for marathons, play in a sports league or simply lead an active lifestyle, your health needs can now be treated by a single specialist. n To learn more or to schedule an appointment with a specialist, visit methodistorthopedics.com. Leading Medicine • Volume 7, Number 1 3 5


Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013
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