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Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013

“With the kind of schedule a college athlete has, it’s hard just keeping an even balance and maintaining the basics. But I am quickly learning what kind of food helps me perform at my best and gives me healthier energy levels.” Rice Owls basketball player Jessica Goswitz and effort to get a superior result. Being competitive, they often see injuries as an obstacle that must be overcome (in order) to get back on the field,” he says. “When a doctor tells an athlete how long he or she is likely to be out, the athlete will see that as a challenge and try to beat that mark and prove they can get back faster.” Lintner says that’s a lesson the weekend warrior can learn from the pros. “Rather than looking upon an injury as an inconvenience, make your treatment and recovery a focal point,” he suggests. “Take the time and effort that you would be putting into your sport and invest it in recovery and rehabilitation.” McCulloch agrees: “Elite athletes are very competitive with themselves, are goal-oriented and results-driven. Applying these same attributes to overcoming your own injury can help you get back on the field faster.” HIGH-PERFORMANCE ATHLETES Jessica Goswitz spends a lot of time at a great height, looking down upon the campus of Rice University. She’s an Owls basketball player in her senior year, but Jessica isn’t a high-jumping center. She’s a guard whose gritty play earned her the Fighting Owl Award last season. Goswitz’s high-flying pastime involves running up and down the steps of Rice Stadium, with ankle weights, often in the sweltering heat that is Houston most of the year. “I’m a gym rat, no question about it,” she says with a chuckle. “No matter if it’s basketball season or not, I can’t keep still.” Her major is kinesiology, or exercise science. She recently completed an internship with a dietitian’s practice in Houston, and that opened her eyes to the importance of knowing one’s body, and what to feed it. “With the kind of schedule a college athlete has, it’s hard just keeping an even balance and maintaining the basics,” she says. “But I am quickly learning what kind of food helps me perform at my best and gives me healthier energy levels.” She has adopted a form of the Paleolithic — or “caveman” — diet, based on what hunters/gatherers of ancient times might consume. The common Paleolithic diet consists mainly of fish, 10 methodisthealth.com/leadingmedicine


Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013
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