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Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013

Humans are built for physical activity. Our bones, joints and muscles work together in a sort of physical symphony — letting us run and jump, climb and throw with remarkable dexterity. We are designed to absorb strain and exert force; with practice and repetition, we gain skill and strength — some of us even compete, earning satisfaction in testing ourselves against others. All of this activity, however, can take a toll. Athletes at all levels — from casual walkers to players in the NFL — sometimes need support from their doctors. Overuse and repetitive stress injuries can reduce function in even the weekend athlete, while professional athletes combine unusual physical strain (and significant risk) with the high stakes of a career. The orthopedists and sports medicine specialists throughout The Methodist Hospital System are fortunate to be able to provide care to athletes on Houston’s professional sports teams and serve the area’s universities, secondary schools and even amateur leagues as sideline physicians and consultants. And every day, we work with casual athletes and individuals at every level to help them stay in good physical condition. In this issue of Leading Medicine, we take a look at some of the work that we do to keep our patients — famous and not — healthy and active for life. n Dr. David Lintner is an orthopedic surgeon at The Methodist Hospital and chief of sports medicine. He is also medical director for the Houston Astros as well as a team physician for the Houston Texans. 5


Leading Medicine Magazine, Vol 7, No 1 - 2013
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