Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine.
Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

Methodist J.C. Walter Jr. Transplant Center - Houston, TX

Why living kidney donation?

Physicians at the J.C. Walter Jr. Transplant Center encourage every patient to ask family and friends to become donors. With living donation, patients have plenty of time to approach family members, friends and others about becoming kidney donors. Living donation provides a very controlled and planned process, giving physicians time to plan for the unexpected.

More than 75,000 Americans are currently awaiting lifesaving kidney transplants. Sadly, the lack of deceased organ donors means several thousand people die waiting every year.

Methodist performs more than 100 kidney transplants each year and is the most active renal transplant hospital in Houston.

Who can be a donor?

Living donors are an extremely diverse group-mothers, fathers, children, siblings, friends and even fellow church members give the gift of life to their loved ones. Just about anyone can be evaluated as a kidney donor. Donors must simply be in good general health, have good kidney function and be willing to give the gift of life. Most kidney donors are younger, but many people in their 50s and 60s have donated kidneys.

Who can be a living donor?

Blood relation is not required to be a donor; many patients receive donations from spouses, friends, members of the community, and fellow church members who have been found to be a match.

Will donating a kidney affect my ability to have children?

The available data shows no connection between donating a kidney and increased risk of complications during pregnancy. A man's fertility will not be affected.

What are the risks for the donor?

As with any surgery, there are risks to the living donation operation, but they are very similar to any other elective procedure in a healthy person. That's why Methodist requires very thorough evaluations for the medical, social and psychological wellbeing of all donors. The donor comes first at Methodist.

Can I donate to someone who doesn't live in this area?

Yes, you can still donate. The transplant team can arrange to have your evaluation done at a hospital in your area. The surgery usually takes place in the recipient's hospital, but special arrangements can be made depending on your circumstances. Your recipient's transplant team will be happy to provide more information.

How much time will I need to take off work?

Your ability to return to work depends on the demands of your job. Donors who work at a desk job can be back to work in as little as 3 weeks; if you job is more physically demanding, it may take 6 weeks or more before you're ready to return

What are the risks for the donor?

As with any surgery, there are risks to a living donation operation, but they are very similar to any other elective procedure in a healthy person. That's why Methodist requires a very thorough evaluation of the medical, social, and psychological states of all potential donors. Ensuring donor health and safety is our primary concern.

How long will i be in the hospital?

Many donors only spend 1 day in the hospital; for others, it could be 2 or 3.

For more information about living donation, call us at 713-441-5451