Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine.
Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

John P. Cooke, M.D., Ph.D.

John P. Cooke, M.D., Ph.D.

John P. Cooke, M.D., Ph.D.


Joseph C. "Rusty" Walter and Carole Walter Looke Presidential Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Disease Research
Full Member 
Chair, Department of Cardiovascular Sciences
Houston Methodist Research Institute

Director, Center for Cardiovascular Regeneration
Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center

Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine in Cardiothoracic Surgery
Weill Cornell Medical College of Cornell University

Phone: 713-441-8322


Education

B.A.   Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (Biology)
M.D.   Wayne State University, Detroit, MI
Ph.D.   

Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, Rochester, MN (Physiology) 

Postdoctoral Training

Resident, Internal Medicine, Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, Rochester, MN
Research Fellow, Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, Rochester, MN
Fellow, Cardiovascular Medicine, Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, Rochester, MN

Biography

Dr. John P. Cooke is the chair of the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences at the Houston Methodist Research Institute and the director of the Center for Cardiovascular Regeneration in the Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center in Houston, Texas.

He trained in cardiovascular medicine and obtained a Ph.D. in physiology at the Mayo Clinic.  He was recruited to Harvard Medical School as an assistant professor of medicine.  In 1990, he was recruited to Stanford University to spearhead the program in vascular biology and medicine, and was appointed professor in the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine, and associate director of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute until his recruitment to Houston Methodist in 2013. 

Dr. Cooke has published over 500 research papers, position papers, reviews, book chapters and patents in the arena of vascular medicine and biology with over 20,000 citations; h index = 76 (ISI Web of Knowledge, 6-2-13).   He serves on national and international committees that deal with cardiovascular diseases, including the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, Society for Vascular Medicine, and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.   He has served as president of the Society for Vascular Medicine, as a director of the American Board of Vascular Medicine, and as an associate editor of Vascular Medicine

Description of Research

Dr. Cooke’s translational research program is focused on vascular regeneration.  The program is funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the American Heart Association, and industry. 

The focus is on restoration or stimulation of endothelial functions such as vasodilation and angiogenesis, using small molecules or stem cell therapies.  In his 25 years of translational endothelial biology, he first described and characterized the anti-atherogenic effects of endothelium-derived nitric oxide; the anti-angiogenic effect of the NO synthase inhibitor ADMA; the angiogenic pathway mediated by endothelial nicotinic acetylcholine receptors; the role for this pathway in states of pathological angiogenesis; and developed an antagonist of the pathway that is now in Phase II clinical trials.  His clinical research group has explored the use of angiogenic agents and adult stem cells in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease.  More recently, he has generated and characterized endothelial cells derived from human iPSCs, and explored their role in angiogenesis and vascular regeneration. Recent insights from the laboratory have clarified the role of innate immune signaling in nuclear reprogramming to pluripotency and therapeutic transdifferentiation for vascular disease.

Major Areas of Research

Endothelium, stem cell, vascular disease, peripheral arterial disease

Recent Publications

Lee J, Sayed N, Hunter A, Au KF, Wong WH, Mocarski ES, Pera RR, Yakubov E, Cooke JP. Activation of innate immunity is required for efficient nuclear reprogramming. Cell. 2012 Oct 26;151(3):547-58. PMID: 23101625

Rufaihah AJ, Huang NF, Jamé S, Lee JC, Nguyen HN, Byers B, De A, Okogbaa J, Rollins M, Reijo-Pera R, Gambhir SS, Cooke JP. Endothelial cells derived from human iPSCS increase capillary density and improve perfusion in a mouse model of peripheral arterial disease. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2011 Nov;31(11):e72-9. PMID: 21836062

Kiuchi K, Matsuoka M, Wu JC, Lima e Silva R, Kengatharan M, Verghese M, Ueno S, Yokoi K, Khu NH, Cooke JP, Campochiaro PA. Mecamylamine suppresses Basal and nicotine-stimulated choroidal neovascularization. Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci. 2008 Apr;49(4):1705-11. PMID: 18385094

Sydow K, Mondon CE, Schrader J, Konishi H, Cooke JP. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase overexpression enhances insulin sensitivity. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2008 Apr;28(4):692-7. PMID: 18239148

Wilson AM, Kimura E, Harada RK, Nair N, Narasimhan B, Meng XY, Zhang F, Beck KR, Olin JW, Fung ET, Cooke JP. Beta2-microglobulin as a biomarker in peripheral arterial disease: proteomic profiling and clinical studies. Circulation. 2007 Sep 18;116(12):1396-403. PMID: 17724262

Dayoub H, Achan V, Adimoolam S, Jacobi J, Stuehlinger MC, Wang BY, Tsao PS, Kimoto M, Vallance P, Patterson AJ, Cooke JP. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase regulates nitric oxide synthesis: genetic and physiological evidence. Circulation. 2003 Dec 16;108(24):3042-7. PMID: 14638548

Zhu BQ, Heeschen C, Sievers RE, Karliner JS, Parmley WW, Glantz SA, Cooke JP. Second hand smoke stimulates tumor angiogenesis and growth. Cancer Cell. 2003 Sep;4(3):191-6. PubMed PMID: 1452225

Heeschen C, Weis M, Aicher A, Dimmeler S, Cooke JP. A novel angiogenic pathway mediated by non-neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. J Clin Invest. 2002 Aug;110(4):527-36. PMID: 12189247

Lin KY, Ito A, Asagami T, Tsao PS, Adimoolam S, Kimoto M, Tsuji H, Reaven GM, Cooke JP. Impaired nitric oxide synthase pathway in diabetes mellitus: role of asymmetric dimethylarginine and dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase. Circulation. 2002 Aug 20;106(8):987-92. PMID: 12186805 

Heeschen C, Jang JJ, Weis M, Pathak A, Kaji S, Hu RS, Tsao PS, Johnson FL, Cooke JP. Nicotine stimulates angiogenesis and promotes tumor growth and atherosclerosis. Nat Med. 2001 Jul;7(7):833-9. PMID: 11433349