Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine.
Houston Methodist. Leading Medicine

Dr. Lidong Qin Awarded Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas Grant

Dr. Lidong Qin Awarded Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas Grant

HOUSTON (April 01, 2011) -The Methodist Hospital Research Institute congratulates Dr. Lidong Qin, Assistant Member of TMHRI and member of the Department of Nanomedicine, for his grant award from The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas for the recruitment of first-time, tenure track faculty members.

Dr. Qin will use this $2 million, four-year CPRIT grant to establish an independent laboratory dedicated to the study of prostate cancer at TMHRI. His lab plans to develop integrated proteomic micro-devices for cancer diagnosis, malignancy assessment and the study of molecular networks in the cancer microenvironment.

"Dr. Lidong Qin is an incredibly talented young man, who has trained with the very best in the world, and excels in the development of highly innovative solutions to intractable clinical problems. We are delighted to have him at The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, and have great expectations that his research program will result in improvements in clinical practice, for all," says Dr. Mauro Ferrari, president and TMHRI CEO.
Trained as a chemist, with intensive research work at two of the national Cancer Institute Centers for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, Dr. Qin is recognized as an expert in technological innovation for cancer diagnosis, prevention and treatment. Dr. Qin received his Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from Northwestern University and completed postdoctoral training in cancer nanotechnology at the California Institute of Technology. His pioneering work in metal nanomaterial synthesis and biological applications, earned recognition with the International Precious Metal Institute graduate student prize.

During his postdoctoral training, he developed automatic proteomic barcode chips that allow highly multiplexed plasma cancer biomarker measurements from a single finger-prick of blood. The method is recognized as a significant improvement over the cost and speed of standard laboratory tests to analyze blood proteins.

For more information on The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas, visit www.texascancercouncil.org/.

For more information on The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, see www.methodistresearch.com. For more information on The Methodist Hospital, see www.methodisthealth.com. Follow Methodist on Twitter at twitter.com/MethodistHosp and Facebook at www.facebook.com/houstonmethodist.